PEUGEOT BOXER 1.9Ltr Diesel Engine Page 9

 

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These pages are dedicated to my experiences of the Peugeot Boxer, 1.9Ltr Turbo Diesel engine and not definitive advise. 

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New Page additions: 
1.Fitting a Turbo Boost Gauge
2.Replacing clutch Cable 

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Contents:

1. Engine Service and Checking Levels.[Part 2]


ENGINE SERVICE

Advice and hints came from this site:    http://www.turbocharger-solutions.co.uk/

    To prevent most failures, may I offer the following suggestions:

  1.   Change the oil at least every 3,000 miles, or more frequently if you wish, although, recent [2016] modern oils can do more miles than my comment here.

  2.   Always use the oil that is recommended by the engine manufacturer. 

  3.    Do not use cleaning additives for it may loosen particles in any used engine.  [ I believe this caused a Cylinder head gasket failure on my van as I did not follow my own advice]

  4.  

       Always let the engine warm up when starting. 30-60 seconds in warmer weather and longer as the temperature drops.

  5.   COLD, THICK OIL DOES NOT FLOW AS FREELY AS WARM OIL! 

  6.   Do not rev engine during warm up time, the turbo may not yet have received a full supply of oil to its bearings. 

  7.    Always let the engine idle for a period when stopping. The faster you have driven, the longer you should let it idle down.

   YOUR TURBO IS STILL FREE SPINNING AT HIGH REVS, WHEN THE ENGINE IS SHUT OFF, THE OIL SUPPLY IS ALSO SHUT OFF, WHICH MAY RESULT IN BEARING DAMAGE ALMOST IMMEDIATELY.

   When oil is changed, always prime the oil filter, fill it with oil,  and crank over engine without starting until oil pressure is observed.  By following these suggestion, and practicing good driving habits, your turbo should last as long as the engine.

Suggested service hints can be seen by selecting the images.

Battery with cover and Impact reset switch
Battery with cover and Impact reset switch.

Near side Chassis Bolt
Near side Chassis Bolt

Bonnet release & Relay container on the Radiator

Bonnet release & Relay container on the Radiator

Diesel Primer Pump
Diesel Hand Priming Pump on fuel filter.

Battery chassis bolt
Off side Battery chassis bolt.

Diesel Fuel Pump
Diesel Fuel Pump

Oil Sump and drain plug

Oil Sump and drain Plug.

Turbo Pipe along side sump

Turbo Pipe along side sump and Gear box.

Impact Switch

Close up view of Impact Switch

Input air filter with cover off

Input air filter with cover off

This is the air Filter Base with the filter removed
This is the air Filter interior base with the filter removed.
Select for larger image showing water drain hole.

Rear Jacking point
Jacking points.

A letter from a Motorhome forum prompted my reply.

I have just got my 'van back from the garage with its new engine and, hopefully, the problem solved. The garage says that water was getting into the engine via a leaking connection in the air intake pipework, where the pipe from the bottom of the airfilter to the turbocharger has a connection coming in from the cylinderhead cover. Water getting in under the bonnet collects on top of the air filter then runs down onto this joint. For some reason, after 7 years and 63,000 miles this joint started leaking, allowing the water to be sucked into the turbocharger.

Anyone know any way to reduce/eliminate this water ingress under the bonnet? does it happen on new Boxers? Does it happen on Fiat Ducatos? If not, why not

Hi, I was intrigued by the description of your fault and reasons given by the garage. I immediately went to have a look at my Peugeot Boxer. I found the pipe mentioned. It comes from the oil filler, acting as an engine oil breather, then being fed back into the turbo input pipe, after the air filter, which is fed directly to the turbo. This connection is a bayonet fitting, into the rubber pipe, which requires a quarter turn to lock. This flexible rubber pipe is not supported properly and is secured with a jubilee clip, I found that my pipe was ready to be pulled out due to the vibration from the engine and oil deposits. My cure is to fit a support to this pipe to ensure there was no vibration at the joint into the air filter pipe.

Regarding water into the engine compartment. I found that leaves had lain in the water well, which normally drains into the heater air input, stopping this action. The water would then overflow on to the top of the air filter. There is a drain hole at the base of the air filter container to ensure no water drains into the turbo input. I wonder if this hole was blocked. This drain hole can be seen in a picture at: www.ourwanderer.org/peug9.htm

Servicing the vehicle brakes can be found in the link below:

http://www.edmunds.com/how-to/how-to-change-your-brake-pads.html


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