After an email query recently, I thought perhaps my drawing above might better explained the functions, as the query was using different switches.

Complete Electric Windows Function

I have drawn the switches as an image of switch, see top of drawing.

Passenger Door Switch:

 [ Note there are no earth tags on the passenger switch. All earth connections are on the drivers door]

S1. One end of the Motor goes to A on S1 lever to C.

C S1 goes to S3 Passenger switch then to earth/chassis.

S2. The other end of the motor goes to F S2 lever to D.

D then then goes to S4 lever to earth/chassis.

The above functions are neutral.

When S1 is switched to B, +12 volts goes to the top of the motor turning it on via the bottom cable to S2 F lever to D, then S4 lever to earth

When S2 is switched to E, voltage is is then via F to motor. The other end of the motor goes to S1 lever to C, the to S3 lever to earth.

With Passenger door at rest:

When S3 is at rest the Passenger door motor is earthed via S3 lever to earth. Also S4  lever to earth.  The Passenger door motor is at neutral.

When S3 is switched, +12 volts goes C S1 on the passenger motor. The motor is earthed via S2 F to lever D the S4 lever to earth.

When S4 is switched +12 volts is switched D S2  lever to F then to Passenger motor. The other end of the passenger goes to S1 lever to C then earth vis S3 lever to Earth.

Drivers door:

S5 lever is to earth and is neutral.

When S5 is switched +12 volts goes to the top of the motor and the other end goes to earth via S6.

When S6 is switched the voltage goes via S6 lever to the bottom of the motor then via S5 to earth.

Note: 

Due to the function/earth cables 1 & 2 going from the passenger door to the drivers door, you will find the window movement will be slower than the drivers door due to the long length of the cables creating a resistance and reducing the voltage to the motors. To offset this problem ensure the TWO cables 1 & 2 are heavier than the others. OR, double the cables in parallel, using TWO cables for each shown as singles.